Men's Journal Shares How Five Chefs in Recovery Live One Day at a Time

 Gabriel Rucker, the Portland chef and restaurateur behind Le Pigeon, Little Bird, and Canard just celebrated his 5th anniversary of sobriety. “I don’t want to be the poster boy for sobriety in my industry. But I did realize that I could be a good example. I could be a bad example, I could be no example or I could be a good example, and I figured I might as well be a good example.”

Gabriel Rucker, the Portland chef and restaurateur behind Le Pigeon, Little Bird, and Canard just celebrated his 5th anniversary of sobriety. “I don’t want to be the poster boy for sobriety in my industry. But I did realize that I could be a good example. I could be a bad example, I could be no example or I could be a good example, and I figured I might as well be a good example.”

Thrillist's Best New Restaurants 2018

 Canard, which means "duck" in French and sticks to Rucker’s bird-as-restaurant-names theme, is Rucker’s more casual concept that serves food for 16 hours a day. “If you’re awake and want to eat, we are probably open,” says Rucker. Service is laid back and the menu feels like it has been pulled out of the brain of a stoner who aced culinary school. Everything here is, quite simply, fun.

Canard, which means "duck" in French and sticks to Rucker’s bird-as-restaurant-names theme, is Rucker’s more casual concept that serves food for 16 hours a day. “If you’re awake and want to eat, we are probably open,” says Rucker. Service is laid back and the menu feels like it has been pulled out of the brain of a stoner who aced culinary school. Everything here is, quite simply, fun.

Food & Wine Shares Where to Get the Best Breakfast in Every State

 Oregon’s obsession with breakfast has famously led them—well, specifically Portland—in some fascinating directions, more recently; not many cities would be lucky enough to have a restaurant like Canard, where they serve you chilled oysters, and stacks of fluffy cakes topped with rich duck gravy, a fried duck egg, and if you’re feeling stupid, seared foie gras, followed up with a salted caramel cream-filled Paris Brest, from 8 o’clock in the everloving morning, all week long and many times over on Sundays. Then again, not many cities are lucky enough to have Gabriel Rucker on board—this is his doing, Rucker, of the (oh look, full circle) James Beard award, of Le Pigeon and Little Bird, two of Portland’s top restaurants. Feels like now there’s a third.

Oregon’s obsession with breakfast has famously led them—well, specifically Portland—in some fascinating directions, more recently; not many cities would be lucky enough to have a restaurant like Canard, where they serve you chilled oysters, and stacks of fluffy cakes topped with rich duck gravy, a fried duck egg, and if you’re feeling stupid, seared foie gras, followed up with a salted caramel cream-filled Paris Brest, from 8 o’clock in the everloving morning, all week long and many times over on Sundays. Then again, not many cities are lucky enough to have Gabriel Rucker on board—this is his doing, Rucker, of the (oh look, full circle) James Beard award, of Le Pigeon and Little Bird, two of Portland’s top restaurants. Feels like now there’s a third.

Food & Wine Highlights the 10 Best Urban Wineries in the Country

 Founded in 2010 by Kate Norris and Thomas Monroe, Division Winemaking Co. sources fruit from both Oregon and Washington states, crafting wines from a handful of varieties, all produced with a hands-off, minimal manipulation mentality in the cellar. Reflecting their passion for sustainable viticulture, many of the vineyards Norris and Monroe choose to work with are certified organic and/or biodynamic. Inside every finished bottle, you'll also find wine inspired by the regions of France, where the duo first studied winemaking.

Founded in 2010 by Kate Norris and Thomas Monroe, Division Winemaking Co. sources fruit from both Oregon and Washington states, crafting wines from a handful of varieties, all produced with a hands-off, minimal manipulation mentality in the cellar. Reflecting their passion for sustainable viticulture, many of the vineyards Norris and Monroe choose to work with are certified organic and/or biodynamic. Inside every finished bottle, you'll also find wine inspired by the regions of France, where the duo first studied winemaking.

Food & Wine Shares Gabriel Rucker's story on being sober and finding clarity as a leader in his restaurant and in the industry

The transition has provided clarity and better ability for me to manage people, it’s a lot less hectic for employees. A lot of people that have stayed on through all those changes, I think are really relieved. And, that's probably why they're still here is because it can be fun to work in a hard-partying place and to have sure, that's fun, but, at the end of the day people come to work. They want consistency, direction and a supportive space.